Mixing and Matching Countertops in Your St. Louis Kitchen

Written by Megan Gerdes

mixing and matching your countertopsIf you are remodeling your St. Louis kitchen, you have probably discovered how many different style choices you have in terms of countertops and other finishings. Sometimes, it’s hard to choose just one; you might fall in love with a couple of different styles and wonder how you can get away with not having to choose one or the other.

Are mixing and matching countertops a good idea?

With so many countertop styles and finishes, it’s easy to find surfaces, colors, and textures that will complement each other. It all depends on what you like.

If you have a kitchen island, it’s an excellent opportunity to do some exciting things with countertops. A lot of times people will do a different color, a distinct edge style, like ogee, or something in a different material altogether. An edge style can be rounded, flared, or flat – there are all kinds of options in terms of how this can look and choosing different styles of edges will provide some dimension without looking drastically different.

(Note that an ogee is the front edge-profile of the countertop).

Whereas a few years ago, everybody wanted a completely white or similarly monotoned kitchen, recent design trends support contrasting colors and styles. Today’s layouts are more open, and many include an island, which is a perfect opportunity to get some contrast and perhaps do something completely different, which is more in line with current trends.

In today’s kitchen design, it’s not uncommon to see two different countertops, two different cabinet colors, or an island as more of an accent piece. As long as open kitchens and islands are a trend, you are likely to find some mixing and matching going on.

Project Example

We’ll talk a little bit here about how we mixed and matched in one of our remodel projects.

mixing and matching your countertops

The client had a built-in hutch. She wanted to paint it a dramatic color to make it stand out a little more against a mostly white/light grey kitchen. We decided that the island would become the focal point in the room, so we painted it the same color as the hutch. The hutch and the island would both be navy, and everything else would be a backdrop, so to speak.

We did a light gray color in the rest of the room and white subway tiles. We did a fancy brass foot rail on the island, brass hardware, and blue drawers to match the hutch. Ultimately, it became more of a feature piece – a little more showy, more dramatic than you would typically find in a kitchen.

Countertops As A Focal Point

In this project, the countertops match with the cabinets, and the contrasting cabinets become the focal point. In truth, there was a lot going on here, so keeping the countertops fairly uniform helped to make the colors and the details on the island really pop. Having contrasting countertops would have made the design look a little busy.

mixing and matching your countertops

Another reason why mix and match countertops would not have worked in this situation is that the island itself is so big – it’s got nearly as many cabinets in it as the rest of the kitchen. Because of that, we didn’t want to have a patterned countertop because it would overpower everything else.

However, if you had a small island and you wanted to stain it and put a granite countertop on it and choose countertops and paint for the rest of the room in a softer shade, that would work very nicely. You’ve got a pop of color or contrast, and it looks really smart.

Budget Considerations For Mix-and-Match Countertops

Most countertops are similar in design, as are most cabinets. Unless you decide you want to use something like a high-end granite or quartz, mixing and matching aren’t going to make a significant impact on your budget. If you are doing a smaller area—like an island or prep area—in a different material, it may be more affordable to do something interesting since you’re not outfitting the whole kitchen. As always, it depends on what you choose.

In the world of kitchen design, it’s really about what you’re going to love. We always advocate choosing something you feel good about because if it’s going to make you happy, then it’s all worthwhile in the end.

Are you thinking about a redesign for your St. Louis kitchen? We’d love to hear your ideas! Reach out today to schedule a conversation. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *